In the mid ‘50s, Hank Mobley’s stature was roughly equivalent to that of John Coltrane and Sonny Rollins. The three tenor saxophonists were members of era-defining ensembles, distinctive stylists making the transition to being leaders in their own right. By the early ‘60s, however, Mobley was eclipsed by the others, his rising star seemingly stalled. Consequently Mobley has been relegated to a relatively minor place in history, even though he was a, principal force in the hard bop movement from its inception in the mid ‘50s to its autumnal glory of the mid to late ‘60s. Listening again to Mobley’s back catalogue makes an excellent case for upgrading Mobley’s status.

In the mid ‘50s, Hank Mobley’s stature was roughly equivalent to that of John Coltrane and Sonny Rollins. The three tenor saxophonists were members of era-defining ensembles, distinctive stylists making the transition to being leaders in their own right. By the early ‘60s, however, Mobley was eclipsed by the others, his rising star seemingly stalled. Consequently Mobley has been relegated to a relatively minor place in history, even though he was a, principal force in the hard bop movement from its inception in the mid ‘50s to its autumnal glory of the mid to late ‘60s. Listening again to Mobley’s back catalogue makes an excellent case for upgrading Mobley’s status.

  • 29 notes
  • 2 months ago
  • Jun 24,2014